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I'm glad I have a huge supply of napkins

Today's Bridge: I thought I might be getting back in stride, but I'm clearly not, as evidenced by my valiant (but failed) attempt to throw away a slam. I had S J-x H A-Q-10-9 D x-x-x C A-Q-5-3, which was barely enough to open 1C, and Dan C. jumped straight to 4NT, standard Blackwood. I responded 5H, which he mistook for three aces, but he decided to stop in 6C anyway. Ken, West, doubled that, and I think Dan redoubled, which is a sensible thing to do when you stop short of your target contract. It was also fortunate, because he only had S A-K-10-5 H 2 D K-Q-x C K-J-10-6-4. Ken started with the ace of diamonds, which made things much easier for me (otherwise, I have to lead diamonds twice from my hand in addition to everything else I need to do), then switched to a low spade. I took it that he didn't have the queen, so I went up with the ace. There are two good lines from here, depending on which opponent has three clubs, but I started with the ace and ten of clubs, and it was Ken who showed out. What I decided to do, after much thought (but not enough), was to cross back to the queen of clubs, cash the ace of hearts, and lead the queen, covered by the king and ruffed. I cashed the king of spades and ruffed the five with my last club, not even noticing Dan H's queen, then led the ten of hearts, again covered and ruffed. I had no entry back to my hand for the nine of hearts, so I could only cash the two top diamonds and register surprise when the ten of spades took the final trick. What I should have done instead was cash the king of spades (it won't be ruffed because I'm crediting Dan H. with the queen), ruff a spade low, cash the ace of hearts and ruff one low (also safe, because if Ken had seven hearts to the K-J as well as the ace of diamonds and a singleton club, he surely would have pre-empted), then ruff the last spade with the queen, ruff another heart with the jack, and finally cash the king of clubs to draw the seven, leaving the top two diamonds for the last two tricks. Incidentally, if Ken shows up with the long club, I cross back to the ace of hearts and finesse the queen immediately, ruffing with the jack as a matter of principle even though the six is just as good (swap the queen and the jack, and I have to ruff high). Then I cross back to my queen of clubs, drawing the last trump on the way, and finesse the ten of hearts using the last trump in dummy. Cashing the king of spades and ruffing a spade with my last little club gets me back to my hand to cash the now-established nine of hearts, throwing the last spade, and again leaving the top diamonds to take the last two tricks. The distributions that would defeat either line are highly unlikely, while the line I played loses to four spades to the queen in either hand OR Dan H. holding the king or jack of hearts. (My assumption that Ken had both was correct, though, and I saw no reason to think otherwise.) That was really the main hand worth considering. Notice that without the spade lead, I'm probably going to take the spade finesse, since that alone will provide my twelfth trick, while establishing hearts depends on Ken holding both honors. There were many ways to go wrong, and I'm amazed the opponents managed to find more of them than I did.

I ate an ugli fruit for breakfast today, which was good, but very messy. I think that's the most important thing that happened today aside from Bridge.

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Yes, I'm THAT Nidoking. Sometimes I write fanfiction... often I waste all my time playing video games and watching anime. But it's not a waste if I enjoy it, right? I can quote from a movie, video game, anime series, or British comedy apropos of just about any situation, and one of my main goals in life is to entertain people. (The other big one is amassing as much anime and manga as I can... see below for a progress report.) That's me in a nutshell. ("Help! I'm trapped in a nutshell! What a bloody great nutshell this is!")
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